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Soon travelling to Sweden? Don’t forget your mobile plan!

When travelling abroad you have to be fully prepared, which also means you need to look for the best mobile plan. There’s a couple of factors that will affect what you are supposed to do such as where you are travelling from, your current plan and the duration of your stay. It’s possible that you don’t have to do anything extra. This article will help you to know what your best option is.

Where are you travelling from?

I’m travelling from a EU-country to Sweden

You’re lucky! This means you don’t have to pay any additional charges to use your mobile phone in Sweden. This is known as roaming, your calls, text messages and data services are charged at domestic rates. Depending on the duration of your stay and/or your current plan you might still have to adapt and get a Swedish sim card.

Got more questions about roaming? This FAQ written by the European Union will help you out.

Attention! In Switzerland, Andorra, Isle of Man, Jersey, Guernsey, Monaco and all other non-EU countries you still pay for roaming!

I’m travelling from outside of Europe to Sweden

Here’s where it’s a get a bit more complicated because there’s a lot of possibilities. Check if your current provider offers some special (data)plan for going abroad, if they do then compare it with the options offered by the main Swedish brands: 3, Tele2, Telenor and Telia.

Deals change all the time, so it’s hard to recommend you the cheapest offer. Shop around and ask the retailers what they would recommend. Or take a look on this site.

If you plan to travel to other EU-countries, the same sim-card should work as the EU have special regulations regarding roaming.

Do you need a Swedish sim card?

The answer depends on the duration of your stay but for most people visiting Sweden from outside the EU, it will almost certainly be the cheapest option.

Attention! When getting a sim, make sure that the sim will fit your phone. It would be a shame if you end up buying a sim that doesn’t fit your phone!

What is the most important in a plan for you?

It could be unlimited calls, texts or data. So make sure when looking at your options, that you find a plan that fits the most towards your needs. If you don’t need a lot of data, then there’s no reason to spend more money on a better mobile plan.

How long are you staying for?

Depending on the duration of your stay, a lot can change, even if you are visiting from an EU-country.

I’m visiting from a EU-country for a short trip

This shouldn’t be a problem, as long as your own mobile plan is decent, you have no reason to buy a sim and no reason to worry about roaming.

I’m visiting from a EU-country for a couple of months

Buying a sim might end up being more interesting for you!
There is a general rule to roaming that as long as you spend more time at home than abroad or you use your mobile phone more at home than abroad, you can pay your standard domestic prices.

But if you are staying in a foreign country for an extended period, your mobile operator can contact you and inform you that you may be subject to charges if you continue to stay abroad. After receiving the warning you have two weeks to start using your phone more in your home country than abroad, otherwise your operator may start applying these charges:

  • €0.032 per minute for voice calls (+ VAT)
  • €0.01 per SMS (+ VAT)
  • €3.50 per GB of data (+ VAT)

I’m visiting from a non-EU-country

Since the new roaming rules from the EU isn’t applicable for you the general rule is not relevant. If you are staying for a short trip, a sim that only lasts for a short duration is more interesting for you and vice versa.

Attention! Make sure that you look at the credit validity of your sim card if you end up buying one.

That about sums it up, there’s a lot of factors that influence the best decision for you so make sure you look at what description fits you best. Enjoy your trip!

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Do I need a Swedish sim card?

Summer holiday tips in Sweden – the corona 2020 edition

Can’t wait to travel to Sweden this summer for your holidays? Due to the corona virus unfortunately not everyone is allowed yet. Check this website to see if you can travel to Sweden.

IMPORTANT – the virus is not gone yet. Check the latest on corona in Sweden.

Göteborg in de zomer

Holidays in Sweden will be slightly different this year. We will be confronted with the measurements against the corona virus when we travel, just like at home. The following applies: keep your distance, wash your hands, stay home if you are ill, … Below I list all the restrictions and recommendations regarding traveling in Sweden + inspiration for a wonderful summer holiday in Sweden .

Oh those lovely Swedish summers

The Swedish summers are wonderful! It starts in late May / early June. The days extend rapidly and nature is in full bloom. It is the most beautiful time of the year for many. The Swedes enjoy the daylight and the midnight sun.

Stockholm sunset in the summer

Life slows down in Sweden during summer. A lot of Swedes take several weeks of holiday just after midsummer to fully enjoy life. Schools in Sweden are closed from mid-June to mid-August. Many companies are also semesterstängt (closed for the holidays) for 4-5 weeks. As a visitor to the major cities, keep in mind that certain restaurants are also closed for a few weeks during the summer months.

During those summer months, ‘uteserveringen‘ (terraces) are popping up all over Sweden. In Stockholm, a dozen streets scattered around the city (until the end of September) turn into gågator or pedestrian areas where the car is banned. The street is taken over by cozy terraces, summer squares and pop-up parks and immediately bring the holiday atmosphere into the city.

Love Sweden - Blessed Swedish Summers

If you see a sign ‘loppis‘ while you are on holiday in Sweden and you enjoy flea markets? Then I can recommend to follow the arrow. They lead to all kinds of cosy flea markets! You can also find them in Stockholm.

Sweden generally has more stable summers than most of Western Europe. The days are longer, there is more sun. Temperatures up to 30° C are no exception! Yes, it rains of course, but often it is very dry during the summer months. In recent years, there has been an eldningsförbud in several regions, which means there is a ban on making open fires (sometimes it is even extended to a more general ban and you are not even allowed to grill or have a barbecue), because of the risk of forest fires. Check the current situation here (Swedish site with map).

Stockholm on a summer evening - Riddarfjärden

Summer travel inspiration Sweden

Below you will find a mix of summer trips in Sweden that I have fond memories of and summer trips that are high on my wish list. Just what you need if you are looking for some inspiration for a holiday in Sweden this summer of 2020.

  • Relax in the Stockholm archipelago, like as on the southernmost island, Landsort, with the delicious kitchen of Svedtilja’s .
  • Cycling in and around Stockholm – combined with a refreshing dip in the water or a walk in one of the nature reserves such as Tyresta or Stendörren.
  • Slow travel at its best: travel by train to Lapland, go wild camping and experience the midnight sun. You can also sleep in the ice hotel. Or visit Kiruna, a mining town that has to move!
  • High on my wish list: a canoe trip through Värmland!
  • After my winter visit to Umeå I would also like to visit this city and discover it in the summer time.
  • My first press trip in Sweden was to Sörmland, the countryside just south of Stockholm. I read the book about the centenarian who climbed out the window and disappeared, fell in love with Mariefred and was surprised by the largest private collection of jukeboxes.
  • Nice memories also of the roadtrip that I made a few years ago through the southwest coast of Sweden. I realize I haven’t written much about that trip here yet. I then slept in the hotel of Per Gessle (Roxette) in Halmstad and dreamed of a house in Båstad (the one in Torekov was quite ok too).
Een van de mooiste stranden van Zweden - Tylösand

Special measures during the summer of 2020

Because the Swedes themselves still have negative travel advice for foreign trips (until at least July 15), they expect that more Swedes will stay in their own country this summer for their holidays. As a result, it can get quite busy at the tourist spots. The government asks to be extra respectful to the nature, animals and other visitors.

For the hikers

If you plan a multi-day hike, take into account the restrictions imposed by the Swedish tourism organization STF due to the risk of spreading the virus. For example, the number of people who can stay in the mountain huts of the association is limited. It is obliged to reserve and pay your place in the cabins in advance. Wild camping is of course possible too (check the local regulations!). The national parks in Sweden are open as usual.

Stendörren

In the restaurant

In restaurants and cafés, it is often the case in Sweden that you have to order at the bar yourself. Due to the corona measures, it is different this summer. The tables stand a bit further apart and there is table service. Takeaway is also possible in many places.

Public transport

Avoid public transport as much as possible and choose alternatives where you can reserve a specific seat. On most trains in Sweden you book a numbered seat. You can replace the metro in Stockholm and Gothenburg by using the electric steps or renting a bicycle.

Landsort

Things to do

Most museums and attractions are open in Sweden this summer. However, capacity is often limited.

Events for more than 50 people have been canceled. Allsång på Skansen will continue this year but without an audience. The concerts in Gröna Lund have been canceled.

The ban on public events with more than 50 people does not apply to open air swimming areas. It is important that everyone keeps a sufficient distance.

Landsort, Sweden

Practical information

There are several options for traveling to Sweden:

Of je nu wil gaan wildkamperen (check ook ‘Allemansrecht‘ en deze handige checklist), een typisch rood huisje (stuga) huren of liever op hotel blijft, er is voor elk (en elk budget) wat wils.

Many museums and attractions work with limited capacity corona measures. More than ever it is important to book your tickets in advance.

Need help planning your trip? Let me map out your trip completely!
Summer promotion : 3 days for 115 euros, instead of 125 euros; 25 euros per extra day . *
You can find all information about the travel planning service for Sweden here.

* valid for all new applications between June 15 and June 30, 2020, please mention ‘summer promotion’ in the comments of the application form.

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Summer holiday tips in Sweden - the corona 2020 edition

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What electrical outlet do you need in Sweden?

If you are planning a trip to Sweden you might be wondering what electrical outlet they use. Depending on your country of residence you might need to bring a power plug adaptor. Nowadays you can’t go more than a day without having to charge your phone, so make sure that you are fully prepared for your trip!

Electrical outlets in Sweden

Sweden uses the Europlug (Type C and F) for electricity. This plug has two round prongs and outputs 230 volts of power in Sweden. The frequency of the plug is 50 Hz.

So if you are visiting Sweden from a country that has a different outlet, like the United States (Type A and B) or the United Kingdom (Type G) you will need an adapter. It is also possible that you will need a converter, because of the frequency and voltage.

To make sure your appliance is designed for 230 volts, check the label near the power cord. If your appliance is not rated for up to 240 volts or 50 to 60 Hz you will need to buy a power converter.

If the label states ‘INPUT: 100-240V, 50/60 Hz’ the appliance can be used in all countries in the world. Nowadays, this is very common for chargers of smartphones, tablets, laptops, cameras and even toothbrushes.

That being said, in general it’s a bad idea to bring any type of hairdryer to Sweden. Due to the high power consumption you will have a hard time finding a suitable converter. You can always check if your accommodation has a hairdryer or buy one locally to make sure your hair still looks great!

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